ADVANCE Resources 2017-11-06T11:21:43+00:00

Resources

 

UC Irvine has Institutional Membership to the National Center for Faculty Development (NCFDD), which provides all of UCI senior graduate students, post–docs, and faculty members access to NCFDD resources.

To begin accessing these resources, please activate your membership here: https://www.facultydiversity.org/institutions/uci. If you require assistance, please contact Samantha Anderson at sanders2@uci.edu.

Membership Benefits

    • Access to NCFDD resources including training webinars, multi–week courses, and discussion forums
    • Access to NCFDD Member Library to view past workshop materials and transcripts
    • Writing retreats and challenges

To learn more about the National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity, please visit their website www.facultydiversity.org.

 

Career Advising through Mentoring *

Career advising is integral to creating an inclusive and transparent faculty culture at UC Irvine. For new and continuing faculty, career advising is a consensual partnership; one that is confidential and serves as a constructive resource for career advancement.

Diversity Opportunities Database

The Diversity Opportunities database connects faculty with the wide range of offices, programs and initiatives that promote equity, diversity and inclusion.

Diversity in the Review Process *

An overview of the place of diversity in the review process. This overview is based on the policy that governs faculty appointment, promotion, and appraisal.

2011 Career Advising/Mentoring Conference Materials

Materials from an event which directors, vice chancellors, and faculty from 5 Southern California UC campuses attend and participate in a conference on improving career advising and mentoring.

Stopping the Tenure Clock/Deferring Mid-Career Appraisals *

“Stop the Clock” is a request that can be made by eligible academic appointees who are parents (mother and fathers, adoptive or natural), who have 50% or more responsibility for the care of an infant or newly adopted child, under the age of five. (Academic Personnel Policy 3-50, Appendix III, and APP 7-12)

Advancement and Promotion

A Handbook of Advice for Tenure-Track and Tenured Faculty.

Published by the Office of Academic Personnel, University of California, Irvine, Revision 2015.

Distinguished Faculty Awards: Research, Teaching, and Service*

A description of the nomination process for Distinguished Faculty Awards.

Academic Review Cycle
Graduate Division on Mentoring  

 

Family Resources

Resources for Living in Irvine *

The UCI ADVANCE Program produced a brochure that encompassed many resources for prospective and incoming UCI faculty that are new to the city of Irvine. Resources found in the brochure include housing information, childcare center, home loans information, history of Irvine, and history of Orange County.

Career Partner Program

The Career Partner Program is a cooperative agreement between the department and the Executive Vice Chancellor’s office, attempting to locate academic positions for partners of newly recruited tenure-track faculty. In exceptional cases, this program may be used in the retention of current faculty.

Child Care Services

UCI faculty and staff have numerous options for child care services.

SitterCity

Sittercity provides UC employees with access to local, pre-screened caregivers, and the tools (including reviews, references and back-ground checks) to review and select the caregiver of their choice.

Regents Point

UCI Human Resources and UCI Emeriti Association have partnered with Regents Point to offer UCI emeriti, retirees, and the family members of active employees priority consideration for admission and a discount of up to 50% on the entrance fee. Regents Point is a continuing care retirement community that offers multiple living options including residential living, assisted living, skilled nursing and memory care.

Lactation Accommodation Guidelines

Lactation Station Locations:

Senate Statement on Work-Life Balance

Written by the Special Senate Committee on Diversity, the Senate Statement describes the family-friendly policies that the University of California provides for faculty.

The UCI ADVANCE Program has produced a brochure* which also details the Academic Senate’s Statement on Work-Life Balance.

The UC Faculty Family Friendly Edge  

The UC Faculty Family Friendly Edge is an initiative designed to develop and implement a comprehensive package of innovative work-family policies and programs for ladder-rank faculty in the UC system. The Faculty Family Friendly Edge will promote the recruitment and retention of the best and the brightest, help all members of the university community achieve their fullest potential as scholars and teachers, and greatly contribute to the continued excellence of the University of California.

 UC Families

UC Families is an online newsletter and resource for faculty, staff, and students at University of California campuses who are balancing academic goals or careers with family life. The website provides resources on UC campuses, UC-wide policy and benefits information, and archives of past advice and discussions. Subscribers can post questions or engage in discussions on topics such as managing work and family, planning the optimal time to start a family, finding advice on progressing academically as a student parent, returning to academia after having a baby, or advocating for flexible work arrangements.

 UC Family Friendly Policies for Faculty and Other Academic Appointees

The University of California has established policies and programs to assist faculty and other academic appointees in balancing the needs of work and family. This web site provides summaries of these family friendly policies and programs.The Office of the President is pleased to announce that revised family friendly policies have been finalized and are effective retroactive to January 1, 2006. Some of the major changes to these policies include:

  • Identifying in one policy section, APM 760, the types of family accommodations available for childbearing and childrearing purposes.
  • Extending the period of active service-modified duties for birth mothers.
  • Providing guidance on part-time appointments.
  • Clarifying that academic appointees shall not be arbitrarily disadvantaged in their promotion, advancement, or compensation because they have elected to take a childbrearing or parental leave, to stop the clock, or to defer a personnel review.

The revised policies are below:

APM 760 (Family Accommodations for Childbearing and Childrearing)*

APM 133-17-g (Computation of Years of Service)*

APM 210-1-c(4) (Instructions to Review Committees)*

APM 220-10, -16-c, -16-d, -18-b, and Appendix B (Appointment and Promotion: Professor Series)*

Housing Information

Faculty and Staff Housing Office
        Rental Office: (949) 824-6254The Faculty and Staff Housing Office helps new UCI Personnel and visiting academics find housing, either on campus or in the community. On-campus resources include 100 two- and three-bedroom rental units in Las Lomas faculty/staff apartments, a small number of one-bedroom condominiums for rent in University Hills, and homes for sale in University Hills (described below).The housing office also maintains apartment guides for Irvine and nearby cities and a listing of community rentals, (furnished and unfurnished, long- and short-term) to meet a wide range of housing needs. In addition, it provides general information and relocation materials such as area maps, school district brochures, motel and hotel lists, and car rental information.
Irvine Campus Housing Authority
        Sales Office: (949) 824-7345The Irvine Campus Housing Authority (ICHA) administers University Hills, a sizable on-campus residential community that includes approximately 1180 owner-occupied residences, including single-family homes, apartments, town homes, and condominiums.Homes in University Hills are priced moderately and are available to UCI faculty and staff. To ensure that the homes remain affordable, their price appreciation is limited to the rate of increase in certain cost-of-living indexes. The land is leased to homeowners at a reasonable annual rate, and any appreciation in the home’s value is shared at the time it is resold.
City of Irvine’s Housing Resources

The City of Irvine’s website provides a list of affordable housing resources in Orange County including, Rent Assistance, Fair Housing, Temporary Housing, Housing Assistance, and Community Support Services.

Location Orange County

What is it like to live in Orange County? This site will tell you about finding a house, car and schools; arts, culture and recreation; our business climate.

2006

Academic Institutions of Minority Faculty with S&E Doctorates (June 2006). Joan S. Burrelli. InfoBrief, Science Resources Statistics.

The Evolving (Eroding?) Faculty Job (May 1, 2006). Jaschik, Scott. Inside Higher Education.

The Revolving Door for Underrepresented Minority Faculty in Higher Education (April 2006). Moreno, Jose F., Smith, Daryl G., Clayton-Pederson, Alma R., Parker, Sharon, and Teraguchi, Hiroyuki. The James Irvine Foundation and Campus Diversity Inititiative Evaluation Project.

Diversification of a University Faculty: Observations on Hiring Women Faculty in the Schools of Science and Engineering at MIT (March/April 2006). Nancy Hopkins. MIT Faculty Newsletter.

Do Women Shy Away from Competition? Linda Gorman. NBER Website. Accessed Monday, March 13, 2006.

2005

More Flexibility on Tenure – If You Ask(2005), Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed (Sept. 23, 2005).

Faux Family Friendly? (2005), Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed (Sept. 15, 2005).

Gender and NIH Grants (2005), Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed (Sept. 14, 2005).

Fruitful Environment for Female Scientists (2005). Doug Lederman. Inside Higher Ed (August 17, 2005).

Helping Women Get to the Top (July 23, 2005). The Economist.

2004

Women Scientists Face Problems (2004). Choi, Charles Q. The Scientist (Feb. 16, 2004).

A Chair in Your Future (2004). Barbara Mathias-Riegel,. ASEE, 13:9.

Hitting the Maternal Wall (2004). Williams, J.C. Academe 90: 6.

Making the Right Moves: A Practical Guide to Scientific Management for Postdocs and New Faculty (2004). Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

So Few Pulsars, So Few Females (2004). S. Jocelyn Bell Burnell. Science (April 23, 2004)

Women Vastly Underrepresented in Academia (2004). Dana Young. Women’s ENews (Jan. 12, 2004).

2003

So Many Committees, So Little Time (2003). Piper Fogg. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Dec. 19, 2003).

The Subtle Side of Discrimination (2003). Williams, Joan. The Chronicle of Higher Education (April 14, 2003).

The Facts of Life for an Administrator and Mother (2003). Laura Skandera Trombley.The Chronicle of Higher Education (Sep. 5, 2003).

Debunking Some Myths About Grant Writing (2003). K. T. Henson. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Jun. 26, 2003).

Gender and the Administrative Search (2003). J. Dowdall. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Jun. 20, 2003).

What Does it Take for Women to Stay in Academic Chemistry (2003). Elisabeth Pain. Science (May 2, 2003).

Benchmarking What Women on Campus Need (2003). Mary Dee Wenniger. Women in Higher Education (Feb. 2003).

Exploring the Color of Glass: Letters of recommendation for female and male medical faculty (2003). F. Trix and C. Psenka. Discourse & Society.

2002

A Message to Hiring Committees (2002). M.M. Heilberger, J.M. Vick. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Aug. 9, 2002).

Faculty Diversity – Too little for Too Long (2002). C. A. Trower, R. P. Chait. Harvard Magazine (Mar.-Apr. 2002).

Panelists offer Strategies For Raising the Number of Women Scientists in Academe (2002). Lila Guterman. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Feb. 20, 2002).

Women who have Children Early in Careers Hurt Their Chances to Achieve Tenure (2002). Thomas Bartlett. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Feb. 12, 2002).

Stubborn Equation Keeps Women on the Minus Side (2002). Phoebe Nobles. Women’s ENews.

Scientist Couples do the Two-Job Shuffle (2002). Watanabe, Myrna. The Scientist, 16.7: 52.

From Scarcity to Visibility:Gender Differences in the Careers of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers (2001). J. Scott Long, Ed. National Academy Press.

 

2000 and Prior

Women in Academe: Two Steps Forward, One Step Back (2000). Taskforce on Women in Academe. American Psychological Association/Women in Academe.

Is There an Unconscious Discrimination Against Women in Science? (2000). H. Georgi, APS News, (January 2000).

The Impact of Gender on the Review of the Curricula Vitae of Job Applicants and
Tenure Candidates: A National Empirical Study
(1999). Rhea E. Steinpreis, Katie A. Anders, and Daw Ritzke. Sex Roles, 41: 7-8.

Why so Slow? The Advancement of Women (1998). Virginia Valian. MIT Press.

Nepotism and Sexism in Peer-Review (1997). C. Wenneras, A. Wold. Nature, 387: 341-343.

Best Practices

Statement on Contributions to Diversity

UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship Program (PPFP): Faculty Hiring Incentive Program*

The pool of UCPPFP fellows derives from a highly competitive selection process. Hosted by campus departments throughout the University of California for up to two years, fellows dedicate their time to advancing their research and participate in professional development opportunities. Of the nearly 600 fellows since 1986, 84% have been hired into faculty positions at R-1 institutions nation-wide in all fields–STEM and Non-STEM. Since 2003, 87 fellows have been hired into faculty positions through the Hiring Incentive Program. The promotion rate of fellows meets or exceeds the campus average. UCI continues to participate in the Faculty Hiring Incentive (see announcement). The hiring incentive recruitment and appointment process is consistent with university policy and campus practice. In this recruitment as in all others, the chair must secure approval from the dean. A recruitment budget for transportation and lodging for the candidate(s) will also be necessary. The school will also provide a negotiated start-up package.

A list of current and former fellows is available at the UCPPFP web page. As part of the preliminary evaluation, it is appropriate for a department to contact a fellow or former fellow for information such as an updated vitae, writing sample, and reference letters. These materials should provide a sufficient basis for the faculty to decide whether or not to proceed with a recruitment.

Once the department has agreed to proceed, the chair will notify the candidate about the interest of the unit in their recruitment. The chair will also request application materials, including an updated vitae and reference letters as well as dissertation, other publications, and teaching portfolio. The conversation must include a clear recruitment timeline wherein the department specifies when it must have the requested materials and, in turn, will inform the candidate about the next stage (or not) of the recruitment process–i.e. on-campus visit. The on-campus visit should proceed like other searches, including departmental seminar (and/or chalk talk), meetings and meals with the faculty and graduate students, and tour of University Hills. As in all recruitments, the department faculty votes to recommend an appointment.

Should you have questions, please contact ADVANCE Program Director Douglas Haynes at advancedirector@uci.edu.

*Under the incentive program, the Office of the President will subsidize the salary of a fellow hired into a regular faculty line for five years. See announcement.

Inclusive Excellence in the Faculty Search Process *

The UCI ADVANCE Program produced the following guidelines for search committees for achieving equity and diversity in the faculty recruitment process.

Guidelines for Multi-Unit and Multi-Disciplinary Faculty Recruitments *

The UCI ADVANCE Program produced the following guidelines for multi-unit searches to ensure that all such searches utilize the campus’ effective practices, including the active participation of Equity Advisors in monitoring the process.

Academic Availabilities Statistics  

The Academic Availability Statistics is for use by UC Irvine academic search committees in assessing the gender and racial/ethnic composition of candidate pools in comparison to national pools of availability.

Difference between Expected and Actual Representation of Ladder-Rank Faculty by School

Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity: Guidelines for Search Committees*  
Best Practices: The Search Committee and the Campus Visit. *

The campus visit is critical to a successful recruitment. This is a list of best practices for a successful on-campus visit.

Guidelines for Chairs and Directors on Promoting a Faculty Culture of Transparency and Inclusion *

This brochure provides guidelines for chairs and directors consolidate existing policies and include other effective practices for promoting a faculty culture of inclusion and transparency. They also afford deans with a framework for the recruitment, appointment and review of chairs as part of their duties as senior administrators.

Higher Education Recruitment Consortium (HERC)

The mission of HERC is to support the efforts of each of the member campuses to retain and recruit outstanding faculty, administrators, and staff through the sharing of information and resources.

Recommended Reading Material for Search Committees

Global Gender Disparities in Science (2013). C. R. Sugimoto. Nature (Dec. 11, 2013)

Gender and the Administrative Search (2003). J. Dowdall. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Jun. 20, 2003)

The Subtle Side of Discrimination (2002). Williams, John. The Chronicle of Higher Education (April 14, 2003)

Benchmarking What Women on Campus Need (2003). Mary Dee Wenniger. Women in Higher Education (Feb. 2003)

Exploring the Color of Glass: Letters of recommendation for female and male medical faculty (2003). F. Trix and C. Psenka. Discourse & Society

A Message to Hiring Committees (2002). M.M. Heilberger, J.M. Vick. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Aug. 9, 2002)

Faculty Diversity – Too Little for Too Long (2002). C. A. Trower, R. P. Chait. Harvard Magazine (Mar.-Apr. 2002)

Panelists offer Strategies For Raising the Number of Women Scientists in Academe (2002). Lila Guterman. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Feb. 20, 2002)

Climate: behaviors within a workplace or learning environment, ranging from subtle to cumulative to dramatic, that can influence whether an individual feels personally safe, listened to, valued, and treated fairly and with respect. Campus Climate Network Group (2002)

UC Climate Survey

UC releases results of 2012 systemwide survey of students, faculty and staff. More details

UCI Results:

UCI Climate Survey Results

UCI ADVANCE Climate Survey

 

  • Click HERE* to view the 2009 Climate Survey Presentation and detailed survey results.

UCI Diverse Educational Community and Doctoral Experience (DECADE) Climate Survey

 

    • Click HERE* to view the 2010 pre-grant climate survey results.
  • Click HERE* to view the 2014 post-grant climate survey results.



Improvement in Climate

 

    • January 2010A memo (PDF)* is sent from ADVANCE Director to Chair of Council on Faculty Wellfare about the faculty job satisfaction and climate survey results.
  • October 2010A response (PDF)* is received from the Chair of Council on Faculty Wellfare, confirming support for improving faculty climate.

UCI Campus Actions in Support of Inclusive Excellence

Recent Campus Actions in Support of Inclusive Excellence (not inclusive of School-based activities)

Microaggressions

Tools




Recommended Readings





Campus Based Trainings

Implicit Bias


* – (a copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader is needed in order to open the PDF file; a free copy can be obtained at the Adobe site)

Enhancing Gender Equity in Academia: Lessons from the ADVANCE Program (2015) Judith Stepan-Norris, Jasmine Kerrissey. Sociological Perspectives (July 15, 2015).

A Chair in Your Future (2004). Barbara Mathias-Riegel,. ASEE, 13:9.

A Message to Hiring Committees
(2002). M.M. Heilberger, J.M. Vick. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Aug. 9, 2002).

Academic Institutions of Minority Faculty with S&E Doctorates
(June 2006). Joan S. Burrelli. InfoBrief, Science Resources Statistics.

Always the Exception: Women and Women of Color Scientists in Historical Perspective
(2014). Douglas M. Haynes. Peer Review.

Benchmarking What Women on Campus Need
(2003). Mary Dee Wenniger. Women in Higher Education (Feb. 2003).

Debunking Some Myths About Grant Writing
(2003). K. T. Henson. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Jun. 26, 2003).

Diversification of a University Faculty: Observations on Hiring Women Faculty in the Schools of Science and Engineering at MIT
(March/April 2006). Nancy Hopkins. MIT Faculty Newsletter.

Do Women Shy Away from Competition?
Linda Gorman. NBER Website. Accessed Monday, March 13, 2006.

Exploring the Color of Glass: Letters of recommendation for female and male medical faculty
(2003). F. Trix and C. Psenka. Discourse & Society.

Faculty Diversity – Too little for Too Long
(2002). C. A. Trower, R. P. Chait. Harvard Magazine (Mar.-Apr. 2002).

Faux Family Friendly?
(2005), Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed (Sept. 15, 2005).

From Scarcity to Visibility:Gender Differences in the Careers of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers
(2001). J. Scott Long, Ed. National Academy Press.

Fruitful Environment for Female Scientists
(2005). Doug Lederman. Inside Higher Ed (August 17, 2005).

Gender and NIH Grants
(2005), Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed (Sept. 14, 2005).

Gender and the Administrative Search
(2003). J. Dowdall. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Jun. 20, 2003).

Helping Women Get to the Top
(July 23, 2005). The Economist.

Hitting the Maternal Wall
(2004). Williams, J.C. Academe 90: 6.

Is There an Unconscious Discrimination Against Women in Science?
(2000). H. Georgi, APS News, (January 2000).

Making the Right Moves: A Practical Guide to Scientific Management for Postdocs and New Faculty
(2004). Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

More Flexibility on Tenure – If You Ask
(2005), Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed (Sept. 23, 2005).

Nepotism and Sexism in Peer-Review
(1997). C. Wenneras, A. Wold. Nature, 387: 341-343.

Panelists offer Strategies For Raising the Number of Women Scientists in Academe
(2002). Lila Guterman. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Feb. 20, 2002).

Scientist Couples do the Two-Job Shuffle
(2002). Watanabe, Myrna. The Scientist, 16.7: 52.

So Few Pulsars, So Few Females
(2004). S. Jocelyn Bell Burnell. Science (April 23, 2004)

So Many Committees, So Little Time
(2003). Piper Fogg. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Dec. 19, 2003).

Stubborn Equation Keeps Women on the Minus Side
(2002). Phoebe Nobles. Women’s ENews.

The Evolving (Eroding?) Faculty Job
(May 1, 2006). Jaschik, Scott. Inside Higher Education.

The Facts of Life for an Administrator and Mother
(2003). Laura Skandera Trombley.The Chronicle of Higher Education (Sep. 5, 2003).

The Impact of Gender on the Review of the Curricula Vitae of Job Applicants and

Tenure Candidates: A National Empirical Study (1999). Rhea E. Steinpreis, Katie A. Anders, and Daw Ritzke. Sex Roles, 41: 7-8.

The Revolving Door for Underrepresented Minority Faculty in Higher Education
(April 2006). Moreno, Jose F., Smith, Daryl G., Clayton-Pederson, Alma R., Parker, Sharon, and Teraguchi, Hiroyuki. The James Irvine Foundation and Campus Diversity Inititiative Evaluation Project.

The Subtle Side of Discrimination
(2003). Williams, Joan. The Chronicle of Higher Education (April 14, 2003).

What Does it Take for Women to Stay in Academic Chemistry
(2003). Elisabeth Pain. Science (May 2, 2003).
Why so Slow? The Advancement of Women (1998). Virginia Valian. MIT Press.

Women in Academe: Two Steps Forward, One Step Back
(2000). Taskforce on Women in Academe. American Psychological Association/Women in Academe.

Women Scientists Face Problems
(2004). Choi, Charles Q. The Scientist (Feb. 16, 2004).

Women Vastly Underrepresented in Academia
(2004). Dana Young. Women’s ENews (Jan. 12, 2004).

Women who have Children Early in Careers Hurt Their Chances to Achieve Tenure
(2002). Thomas Bartlett. The Chronicle of Higher Education (Feb. 12, 2002).

Other Resources

Instructional Resource Center

Our goal is to support UCI’s learning mission by providing teaching consultation, pedagogical development, instructional technology, and classroom support.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Resource Center
        (949) 824-3277The UCI Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Resource Center provides support information and referrals about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and heterosexual issues.
Policies & Procedures

UC Irvine’scentralized location for campus and systemwide policy and delegation of authority information.

Tenure Handbook *

The Tenure Handbook is a document that describes the process of advancement and promotion at the University of California, Irvine, and is intened to highlight more informally than the Academic Personnel Manual key aspects of procedures. It includes summaries of University policies and provides advice about strategies for advancement and promotion.

UC Diversity
The University of California is committed to achieving excellence through diversity in the classroom, research lab and the workplace. It strives to establish a climate that welcomes, celebrates, and promotes respect for the contributions of all students and employees.

For additional faculty resources, please visit the Office of Inclusive Excellence Faculty Resource page.

 

 

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